Change, Growth, and Wisdom

Changing and growing are similar but separate concepts.

Change has no positive or negative connotations. It is just the objective and constant state of existence. Growth, on the other hand, means a positive shift towards the best possible outcome of an organism; becoming larger, stronger, and more capable of survival etc.

Things will always change, but things may not always grow…

Make sure your choices and actions aid you in growth. Build the patterns choice by choice, day by day, until you are no longer conscious of them.

Building a habit of positive growth is something that will ensure your success in any aspect of life. Many sacrifices must be made, starting usually with the ones that that lead to short term pleasures. But, the hard choice will usually bring the most long term benefit and reward.

Growth can be a very painful and uncomfortable process. Learn to recognize and love these sensations.

By knowing these instances, we can actually find enjoyment and satisfaction in these painful moments, acknowledging the “need” one has for these experiences in order to reach higher levels of wisdom and growth.

This lesson can most potently be found within the Nauthiz rune; as trials, tribulations, and resistance in life can ultimately force one to become stronger in mind, body and spirit. Likewise, the rune represents a “make or break” aspect within ourselves, where we can either succeed by force of will, or fail out of weakness.

In summary, it is important to remember that the comfortable life doesn’t give one wisdom.

Life, in many ways and for all beings, is war.

Take a look at your life, choices and actions. Make sure they are aligned with your growth and not just pure change. Strive to conquer obstacles and not cowardly avoid things that are hard to do or figure out.

Wisdom must be hunted for within dark corners; wandered for with sweat and blood.

Essentially, wisdom is experienced, not learned.

Get out there and find it!

Tradition and Rhythm

“(Tradition) cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labor.” – T.S. Eliot

Unless we establish rigorous and unshakable tradition in our own lives, we will never experience the countless secrets hidden in the rhythms of nature.

Like the seasons, like the cosmos, like music…

Everything is acting in rhythm.

The spinning wheel, the beating drum, ritual, poetry…

All emulations of this rhythm.

Everyday, every minute, every action has its place.

ᚱ ᚱ ᚱ

Food for Thought

Clean eating, exercise, appropriate water consumption, and meditation should all be thoroughly explored and practiced before entertaining thoughts or pursuits of mind/body altering medication.

Take care of yourself, get stronger, and cut out unnecessary comforts.

Keep yourself accountable.

Times are definitely not getting easier, so make yourself harder.

The Roads of Hel

It is more often written about, when referring to Winter, to discuss and focus on our maintaining and cultivating of light and fire (physical and metaphysical) in the home, family, and soul etc… We know of many Northern European customs, such as inviting the evergreen into our home during the Yule season, surrounding ourselves with family, song, and good cheer. All of this was done to maintain an “internal fire” within individuals and the “greater individual” of the community, combating an otherwise dark, uncertain, and gloomy part of the year. Symbols of hope, life, and fertility surround us while the Earth sleeps outside. However, this drive for “coziness” must also be mixed with an embrace for the bitter forces of Winter. The less spoken of, and less practically applicable operation in the modern world, is our need to mimic this cycle in its’ “darker” or more unseen aspects.

Winter must be internalized and used for “dark” magic. Acts and meditations that make us look inward and transform ourselves must be sought after and certain rites must be carried out. Chtonic indulgences and deep introspection must be undergone as we walk the roads of Hel within. All intensive personal work and external “curse” work should be done in the Winter; get rid of all your baggage, attachments, and rise anew with Spring, rejuvenated. The Winter is a time (and test) to impose our higher Will upon our internal canvas, “setting the bar,” so to speak, on our future self. While things are harsh outside, we must be harsh inside, becoming that which we see as our higher self, emerging victorious with the Sun. Unfetter yourself and your soul; heal the Hamingja.

The Wanderer

One of the most important things about Odinism is traveling.

This of course applies to the Shamanic or visionary aspect, but more importantly to the physical traveling or “wandering” of the Earth.

The Odinist must track down sacred places, spend nights alone in new woods, explore the vast deserts, the mountain peaks, the lakes and rivers and valleys green and lush. To enjoy reckless and unwavering ecstasy and new experience, to make new friends and open oneself to all the possibilities of life. To gain as much wisdom and knowledge as possible in this brief incarnation.

Wandering defeats fear and attachments; delivering solace in the self and a destruction of the need for useless “stuff.” Traveling shows us what is important to not only ourselves and our needs, but also that which is important to humans in general, as you will encounter every imaginable type of person to learn from along the way and begin to see patterns and similarities in people and even cultures.

This is Odinic action. The becoming of the wandering God.

Hailaz Wōdanaz!

Control Your Mind, Control Your World

Something I learned from (and credit to) growing up around Buddhism was to take responsibility and ownership of my own mindset and actions.

When you realize that your suffering is not caused by others, but by yourself, you begin to reform the way you view and react to life and its’ obstacles.

This realization brings freedom in knowing that no one can make you feel any sort of way. It is only you who allows things to affect you or not.

I don’t think striving for full disassociation or indifference to the material world is a good end goal to have, but it is wise to realize that you control your mind and your ability to suffer or not, not the others around you.

Even in reference to pain (the easiest argument against this concept), a trained monk or practitioner can remove themselves from the physical sensations of the body, or rather, control the neural pathways associated with their attachment to pain and the phenomenon that it causes within us.

Pain becomes like anything else, an impermanent sensation without negative or positive attachments associated with it, just an experience of the only true constant, change.

All forms of true initiation are meant to be turned inward before they can be directed outward. Not the other way around. This is the premise of what Westerners would call “magic(k).” It isn’t necessarily to control what lies outside the mind as much is it to establish control of the Mind in reflection of its Highest Self or Will.

Remember that if you can control your mind, you can control your world.

Internal Alchemy

When people approach others for spiritual guidance or advice (aside from dedicated teacher/student relationships) they usually expect them to deliver some sort of elaborate truth on a silver platter; some almighty answer that removes their need to search or do the internal “Alchemy” that is required of them in this life.

However, even if the person being questioned felt like they had those answers, from a completely spiritual context, what works for them most certainly should not work for you. These answers can only be brought forth, reawakened, and transformed internally by your own experience and growth. Teachers can assist in this flowering of spirit, but ultimately it is their job to inspire you to do the work yourself, not do the work for you.

This is how forming a Gnostic and deeply personal spiritual system is undergone. Keep pushing yourself and keep digging deeper. Strive to try new things at every opportunity and never be afraid to experiment with life’s journey; move with it and don’t get locked into any type of stagnation.

An Indo-European perception of Sin.

Sin means to deviate from that which we are devoted to.

This can have completely metaphysical and divine connotations or completely secular and material ones, it makes no difference in its relevance.

When you truly devote yourself to something you must consider every moment and action that doesn’t coincide with your own mastery or understanding of that something as a sin.

Not always against a God, but against yourself, your Highest self.

The God within you; the God you’re becoming.