Further Analysis of the Algiz Rune

Algiz

ᛉ / Z

Algiz is a rune with many meanings, names, and connotations. In Proto-Germanic, it goes by the name Elhaz or Algiz, both of which mean“elk”. This rune symbolizes the largest and most robust of the male deer, mirroring the antlers in shape and meaning. Algiz represents defense, vitality, strength, protection, health, fertility, and the entirety of the forest; that which the Elk overshadows. In reference to antlers, or horns, Algiz can be attributed to the Celtic god Cernunnos, the Horned One. In many pagan faiths, Cernunnos (Hurnaz) is the “Lord of the Forest” and the animals therein.

As with Cernunnos, Algiz can also be associated with hunting. The hunter must form a sacred relationship with these animals and their environment, studying them and meditating on them. The skilled hunter needs to not only have knowledge of these animals and their nature to be able to hunt them effectively, year after year, but also develop a deep respect and understanding of them; a dedication to observing their patterns and habits. The hunt is a sacred activity, whether for food or for sport. Algiz reminds us of this sacred relationship we must maintain with the forest and its’ beings to live in harmony amongst it; reaping rewards from it and giving back with reverence.

In Old English, this rune goes by the name eolh, meaning “elk or moose”. This is also reflected in Old Norse, with the word elgr, which also means “elk or moose”. This reverence of horned animals goes back to the root word of Algiz in the proto-Indo-European hel-, meaning “deer, elk, and elephant”. The “Old English Rune Poem” states:

“Elk sedge has a home oftest in a fen,

It waxes in water; wounds grimly,

Besmears with blood every man

Who lays anywise ahold of it.”

This is the only poem that refers to this rune as the Elk. Although here, its reference is regarding the sedge plant, which is barbed and sharp like the antlers of an elk. These sedge plants can cause one to bleed if grasped or stricken by its’ spines, as one would be by the antlers of the elk, if attacked. Sedge is commonly found amongst the “fen”, which is a type of marsh, bog, or swamp. This could be the allusion to the abundant life-force and robust natural energy associated with the elk, something our ancestors may have seen reflected in these natural environments.

It is safe to say that Algiz carries a certain masculine energy within it, separate from the other horned animal rune, Uruz. Algiz is more focused and less chaotic; fertility and health based on steady wisdom and not ancient fury. The grace of the elk or moose has long been an impressive force to behold, and they demand our respect. This beauty is inherent in the Algiz rune.

In the Younger Futhorc, this rune shifts names and sounds, being called in Old Norse, Madr, meaning “man”. This form of Algiz absorbs the Mannaz rune, taking it on as its focus and sound while retaining the core shape of Algiz. The “Old Norwegian Rune Rhyme” states:

“Man is an increase of earth;

Great is the grasp of the hawk.”

This poem invokes man as the “increase” of earth (dirt), something that refers to our transcendence over pure terrestrial matter. This points to mans divinity and difference from the rest of nature around him, as he has an “increased” awareness of his own existence. The second line alludes to the feet of the mighty hawk, who’s shape mirrors the rune in appearance.  

As with the Norwegian verse, the “Old Icelandic Rune Poem” echoes this rune as “man” as well, stating:

“Man is sport for man, and an increase of earth,

And the adorner of ships.”

This poem states man as “sport” for man, meaning competition, training, entertainment, and coaching. In short, we are pushed competitively by our fellow man towards greater heights, creating a “sport” out of life. The second part reflects the same notion as the Norwegian poem, referring to mans’ divinity. The last line, in my opinion, is a poetic reference to a fully armed ship, “adorned” with men as though decorated.

Although the name and focus shift drastically between the Old English and Scandinavian poems, they all resonate a tone of good health, virility, and power. This, we can say with confidence, embodies the “light” side of Algiz, while the “dark” side encompasses old age, degradation, and loss of health. This can be seen in the Proto-Germanic aldiz, which means “age, generation, lifetime”, and in the Gothic alþeis, meaning “old.”

There is no doubt that Algiz can also be attributed to the trees, as its shape mimics a tree (or man) with outstretched limbs. This is something that alludes to the Norse creation myth, where it is said that life was given to two posts of wood, creating the first two humans Ask (Ash) and Embla (Elm). Evidence can be found in our previously viewed proto-Indo-European root word hel-, which also refers to certain types of trees displaying a “bright” bark like alder, elm, and fir. Further evidence can be found in the Bulgarian elhá, meaning “fir, evergreen, or conifer”.

This brings us full circle in our journey through Algiz, as elk, moose and deer are all known for stripping bark from trees with their antlers. This implies a deeper connection between the hart (stag), the forest, and the trees themselves. This spirit, as stated before, can only be attributed wholly to one force: that force being Cernunnos/Hurnaz, the Horned One; the deified representation of life and the natural wilderness. Algiz, in this respect, can be viewed as a direct runic symbol for this god, as one would use Ansuz for Odin, or Thurisaz for Thor.

In conclusion, Algiz can be attributed many positive forces, such as good health, potency, vigor, and the ability to protect that which we care for. It can also take a darker form in the aspects of old age, bad health, and sterilization. Algiz takes the form of “man” in the Younger runes, representing divinity and power, something echoed in all forms of this rune, whether focused on man or elk. The majestic antlered beasts of the woods and plains have long fascinated mankind with their beauty and brilliance, and although we also hunt them, we have never forgotten that mystical energy that they carry within. A certain peace and stillness resides in these creatures, directly connected beneath their hooves to the spirit of the Earth itself, giving it expression through robust and vital presence and purpose.

Runes : Video 8 – Introduction to the Younger Futhorc Runes, Part.3

In this video, I will give a brief rundown of the meanings and basic interpretations of runes 12-16 of the Younger Futhark (Futhorc).

For more information about the esoteric and practical side of runes, you can pick up a copy of my book “Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna: European Sorcery and Divination” on Amazon.

Hailaz

*I have no academic credentials regarding any of these topics. I am a private researcher and practitioner of this school of traditional Germanic occultism and share information regarding my experience along the way.

Runes : Video 7 – Introduction to the Younger Futhorc Runes, Part.2

In this video, I will give a brief rundown of the meanings and basic interpretations of runes 7-11 of the Younger Futhark (Futhorc).

For more information about the esoteric and practical side of runes, you can pick up a copy of my book “Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna: European Sorcery and Divination” on Amazon.

Hailaz

*I have no academic credentials regarding any of these topics. I am a private researcher and practitioner of this school of traditional Germanic occultism and share information regarding my experience along the way.

Runes : Video 6 – Introduction to the Younger Futhorc Runes, Part.1

In this video, I will give a brief rundown of the meanings and basic interpretations of runes 1-6 of the Younger Futhark (Futhorc).

For more information about the esoteric and practical side of runes, you can pick up a copy of my book “Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna: European Sorcery and Divination” on Amazon.

Hailaz

*I have no academic credentials regarding any of these topics. I am a private researcher and practitioner of this school of traditional Germanic occultism and share information regarding my experience along the way.

Custom Runes and Bindrunes

I make runes nearly everyday. It keeps them fresh in my mind and allows me to express divine concepts through simple symbology.

With runes (and bindrunes) one can essentially deliver ideas to a fellow initiate without words; a language of its own based on the culture of those using them. This is the premise of all symbolism; the transfer of immense amounts of knowledge through very simple forms.

Here, we have a bindrune symbolizing Odin’s sacrifice on the Great Tree, where after 9 nights, he falls “screaming,” receiving the secrets of the runes. A gift for a gift (sacrifice).

Broken down we have :

ᛇ – Eihwaz (Yggdrasil, Axis Mundi, World Tree)

ᚬ – Oss (The hanging god, Odin)

ᚼ – Hagal (Hail, transformation, change)

ᚷ – Gebo (Gift, sacrifice, exchange)

If you want this, contact me. It’s made on Norway Spruce harvested from our land. If you want something custom of your own design, I would be honored to make it a physical reality. I have access to many kinds of wood, many of which are already processed and cured.

I have many runesets available as well. These include Elder Futhark, Younger and Anglo-Saxon Futhorcs. Adalruna sets are available as well, all on various wood types.

Hailaz

Rune Ruminations

:

Lords of wealth,

And Earthly stride,

Pave the way,

Where wagons ride.

:

Drinking from,

Those robust horns,

Wild, merry,

Fighting forms.

:

Building high,

Crumbling low,

Bushes prick,

Protect from foe.

:

In the chest,

There lies a flame,

Howling wind,

Calls the name.

:

While in motion,

Keeping wits,

Travel far,

On land or ship.

:

On the wall,

The iron holds,

Illumination,

Of the soul.

:

Equal arms,

And roads to cross,

Giving and-

Accepting loss.

:

When one sits,

In total silence,

Peaceful sky,

And setting sun.

:

A sudden change,

To rouse the soul,

Under toil,

Life unfolds.

:

The lesson learned,

The wisdom gained,

From times of strife,

From times of strain.

:

That which blocks,

Can also shine,

Stillness heals,

And also binds.

:

Round and round,

The wheel turns,

Largest fests,

And wood to burn.

:

High and low,

Our arms in each,

Up and down,

Is all in reach.

:

Roll the dice,

Already known,

By the well,

There sits a crone.

:

Alert to all,

Wind or squall,

Blood rushes,

Antlers tall.

:

Sword of light,

Bolt on high,

Shine your rays,

From cloudless skies.

:

Measures made,

And painful trades,

Wars to win,

And debts to pay.

:

Silver, yellow-

Black and white,

To gaze upon,

In pure delight.

:

Trust in friend,

And never foe,

Ones we move with,

Bonds that grow.

:

Two wishes,

One reward,

Bridge of gaps,

Connecting fjords.

:

Roads upon,

All things connect,

The higher world,

And darkest depths.

:

Enclosed within,

A hidden space,

Seeds were sown,

Now taking shape.

:

Holy home,

Within the blood,

Sacred space,

From fire or flood.

:

At the end,

There shines a light,

Decimation,

Of the night.

Memory of Younger Runes

ᚠ – Fe is domestic,

ᚢ – Ur is chaotic,

ᚦ – Thurs is both for the good and the bad.

ᚬ – Oss is for breathing,

ᚱ – Reid is for riding,

ᚴ – Kaun is the torch that burns all around.

ᚼ – Hagal is harshness,

ᚾ – Naud is resistance,

I – Is marks the silence frozen in time.

ᛅ – Ar is the cycle,

ᛋ – Sol is the sun-flow,

ᛏ – Tyr is the pillar holding the sky.

ᛒ – Bjarkan is whitest,

ᛘ – Madr is wisest,

ᛚ – Lagu is water, tides, and the moon.

ᛦ – Yr is the crossroads,

A path you must choose,

One path you win and one path you lose.

Second Edition of ‘Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna: European Sorcery and Divination’ Out Now!

Pleased to announce that edition two of “Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna: European Sorcery and Divination” has been published and is now available worldwide via Amazon.

Personal copies have been ordered and should arrive in the next couple weeks.

This version includes a new cover, new chapter covering the Younger Futhorc runes, new bindrunes, and various additions to the previous content.

The book runs for 154 pages and is an intermediate read for those at any stage of rune work, research, and development.

If you have the first edition, leave a comment with something you were able to take away from the book. I’m interested in hearing your thoughts.

Help spread the word by sharing and feel free to leave a review, they help a lot.

Hailaz