Runic Possession

Fe can be prison,

If one isn’t wise,

For all of desire,

Wears its’ disguise,

If made in masses,

One takes his chances,

Without it he would-

Most certainly rot.

Ur is the kettle,

Steaming on fire,

Screaming with fury,

Sounds of creation,

Hoof in the soil,

Horns up at heaven,

Creature of mighty,

Ancient endurance.

Thurs are the native,

Gods of the soil,

Forces of chaos,

Darkness and wisdom,

Dwell in the forest,

The heart of the stone,

Archaic shield,

The hammer and thorn.

Oss is the Daemon

The core of the Self

Krishna and Shiva

Internal and all

8 legs of terror

Carry the father

Dispenser of gifts

Of breath, art, and war.

Reid is the motion,

Tempo and rhythm,

Commanding order,

Under the cosmos,

Following patterns,

Internal cycles,

Around and around,

Again, and again.

Kaun will destroy you,

If fearful you live,

Attachment to flesh,

Makes it burn that much more,

Let your soul go free,

To the Gods give thee,

If one will control,

This holy fire.

Hagal is hardship,

When water has died,

Fall from the heavens,

A crystal disguise,

Beauty wreaks havoc,

On those unaware,

New life is stirring,

Under broken stalks.

Naud is the nail,

That pierces the soul,

Trial and error,

Ignite the fire,

Conquering spirit,

Sheer force of the Will,

Closer and closer,

To the gates of Hel.

Is is the frozen,

Stillness of being,

The Gods of decay,

Less potent against,

Moving with cosmos,

Ebbing and flowing,

Far in the distance,

Before there was time.

Ar is the pleasant,

Harvest of riches,

A potent symbol,

The rune after 9,

Prosperity comes,

Prosperity goes,

Years like to travel,

Wheels on the road.

Sol burns with fury,

The powerful flame,

Vanquish the darkness,

I call on your name,

Sunna the shining,

Goddess of fire,

Destroy every woe,

And weakness within.

Tyr is God and judge,

Godi of justice,

Father of daylight,

Loyal and mighty,

A prophetic doom,

Beset you when He,

The God of the hanged,

Brought forth the old witch.

Bjarkan makes mighty-

Men fall to their knees,

The goddess of Hel,

Her half that is life,

Medicinal tree,

A beauty to see,

Below these old roots,

The dead call to me.

Madr is stretching,

Arms towards the sky,

It is said that man-

Once came from two trees,

They washed up on shore,

With no shape or form,

Till the 3-faced God,

Brought them their honor.

Lagu is the night,

The moon and the tide,

Expansive and deep,

Mysterious world,

The sanguine water,

A formless life-force,

That which also drowns

Touches all that breathes.

Yr is Yggdrasil,

The evergreen tree,

A symbol of life,

Concealing death,

Connecting the worlds,

Of heaven and Hel,

Mirror the cosmos,

Map of ancient space.

Philosophy of Yoga

The term yoga is an ancient one deriving from Sanskrit, originally from a proto-Indo-Iranian word yáwgas (team, yoke) and even more archaic proto-Indo-European word yewg (to join, yoke, tie together). When the common westerner hears the word yoga, he/she is likely stricken by visions of skinny, stretching, robed monks, silently posturing in abstract positions. What many do not realize, however, is that yoga applies to many different techniques, practices, and traditions. Additionally, many people practice yoga without being conscious of it, as it is more associated with purpose and action than it is with pure movement. The technical definition of the word means “a spiritual practice or teaching that aims to master the body, mind, or spirit.” In this context, anyone with extreme mastery within these fields of life is a practitioner of yoga, as long as this practice is intended and directed towards the positive development of mind, body, or spirit.

One could say that some sort of belief in the divine must be associated with this practice, as material mastery and purely mechanical operations do not seem to qualify as yoga without a higher purpose which one practices yoga in honor of. Mastery without purpose is near worthless, and likewise, purpose without a form of mastery is fantasy.

The channels or techniques of yoga are endless in spectrum, as one can do many things, such as the classic forms of stretching and meditation we commonly associate with yoga and yogis. Martial arts, physical exercise, hiking, art, music, crafting, writing, and most forms of creative or conscious repetitive action are all forms of yoga. If the action is meant to help the operative transcend or control body and consciousness, then it is fair to say that it would fall under the loose definition of the word yoga. In a way, every act in life could be considered yoga, if applied to them sacred and divine context.  

Yoga, through a resurrection and travel through linguistic history, appears to have a common theme in joining together, bringing into union, or “yoking.” Through this union, which could very well be seen mirrored in the alchemical schools of the west, creates, manipulates, and masters man’s position in the cosmos. The yogi, through yoga, connects, joins, and unifies intention and purpose into an action. He translates physical movement into a metaphysical act of devotion. If we look at the linguistic “criteria” for yoga, thus far, we can safely say that if our chosen practice aids in our self-mastery, our path of ascension or dharma, then we successfully practice yoga. If you achieve mastery over your technique, this is what it means to be a yogi.