Irreplaceability, Mastery, and Glory

All men really want is to be irreplaceable.

Mans higher purpose is to become a master of something… a professional at X, a genius on Y, an authority on Z.

When it comes down to it, men want nothing more than to become irreplaceable. They want to know that no one can fill their shoes; that their existence has a meaning tied to their form. They want to know within that they have made a contribution and that their memory/legend will live on beyond the grave; whether or not one has heirs.

Man wants to conquer great obstacles, ascend the highest peaks, and soar into the blackness of space; each one wants his unique piece of the glory.

At a certain point, we must ask ourselves if this is really a bad or negative trait to possess. In reality, yes and no cannot answer this sufficiently, as it seems to be “natural” instinct for driven humans to behave like this.

Do we call the hunting aspects of a mountain lion negative or evil, even when they sometimes kill humans? No, it is natural for them to hunt any prey that is liable and in their territory.

The humans’ need to conquer seems to be akin to this type of instinctual, non conscious behavior; transcending a human “right” or “wrong” duality. Repressing this can be detrimental to one’s own life and the lives of those around him. But, through wisdom, it can be mastered and maneuvered with divine accuracy.

This view ties one in with the physical and metaphysical simultaneously, as one must achieve earthy victories in order to attain the metaphysical “legacy” one wants to build or acquire. In many ways, although this doesn’t seem to offer any sort of climax or end, it reinforces man’s role as the being “in the middle.” We exist within that context, as a wheel in between tracks, moving onward into eternity.

We emerge and dissolve into many forms, although, the deeper parts of our spirit continue to rise ever higher.

Walpurgisnacht

Hailaz Walpurgisnacht!

However you choose to celebrate the next couple days, do it with your full attention.

Meditate on life in its myriad forms.

Banish any fetters holding you down in the damp halls of Hel.

Personally, we will be preparing a part of the homestead for the return of our patron deity of peace, plenty, and fair weather (Freyr,Ingwaz, Fraujon).

(In our practice, Freyr departs after Samhain and returns on May Day.)

Before we do this, we wish to shield ourselves and our land from all forms of evil and misfortune with song, ritual, and fire.

Under the darkest of moons we shall embody the Sun,

Becoming the fire that licks the sky.

Filling our hearts with strength,

impregnating our minds with ferocity.

Let us transcend the depths,

On the wings of the eagle!

ᚠ : ᛉ : ᛋ

Holy Trinity Bindrunes

These two bindrunes represent the Holy Trinity of ancient Germanic Paganism. The gods who encompass this trinity are traditionally the Sky Father, Earth Mother, and Thunder god. As seen on both runes, reading from top to bottom, we see the runes : : representing Odin (Sky Father), Thor (Thunder God), and Freyja (Earth Mother). The left bindrune is mirrored on both sides while the right consists of single runes.

Eagle Bindrune

From ‘Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna : European Sorcery and Divination’ Page. 102

The “Eagle” bindrune was created using the Proto-Germanic word Arô meaning Eagle. It consists of the runes ; with inverted runes added to enhance visualization and intent. This bindrune was made in the linear form, with additional enhancements to intensify and complete the spell. This symbol is used to deepen spiritual connections to the ancestral lineage and to draw wisdom from the past. Meditate on this rune to conjure memories of past lives and incarnations.

The Eagle represents our Higher self rising from the talons of Death; traveling into the spiritual realm and passing through the stages of rebirth. We are physically () gripped by the talons of death (ᛣ) and thrust upward () into the next form; the process of the reincarnation of the Spirit (). The twelve dots represent the twelve months of the year, which reemerge endlessly like our spiritual essence. Additional () runes have been added for wings, signifying the breath/spirit travelling upward after death. In total this gives us four () runes at the crown of the bindrune, indicating the unified order of the spirit reemerging.

The eagle is a totemic animal of Odin, who takes on this form in the Eddas. The Eagle watches everything above the World Tree, soaring high above all realms like the All Seeing Eye of Odin. This Eagle delivers messages from the higher reaches of the cosmos and is revered for its wisdom and majesty. The veneration of Odin as the Great Ancestor is acknowledged through this bindrune and will enhance connections with Odinic or ancestral forces.

Hurnaz (Cernunnos) Bindrune

From ‘Runes, Bindrunes and Hahalruna : European Sorcery and Divination’ Page. 116

This bindrune reads Hurnaz and consists of the runes . This symbol is used to attract or invoke the Wild Spirit of the forest and all associated guardians therein. Hurnaz is a Germanic title for this force, meaning “Horn.” This is a direct translation of the powers represented by the Celtic god Cernunnos. Carve this on any tree near the perimeter of your property that borders the forest; it will invoke good luck and protection from the Forest Gods.

When used in ritual, place a talisman of wood, stone or bone with this symbol carved into it on each cardinal point of the work space. This will create a charged area of focus and intensity for you to carry out your functions in. In this space, you can be assured that no detrimental outside forces are granted access to you or your sacred enclosure. All powers of ill intent will be repelled by the presence of these runes around your work space. This can also be painted on the skin for the same purpose; being especially handy when working alone in the woods. Paint with whatever materials you have available to you. Ideally, use ash, blood, or both to create a usable paint.