Change, Growth, and Wisdom

Changing and growing are similar but separate concepts.

Change has no positive or negative connotations. It is just the objective and constant state of existence. Growth, on the other hand, means a positive shift towards the best possible outcome of an organism; becoming larger, stronger, and more capable of survival etc.

Things will always change, but things may not always grow…

Make sure your choices and actions aid you in growth. Build the patterns choice by choice, day by day, until you are no longer conscious of them.

Building a habit of positive growth is something that will ensure your success in any aspect of life. Many sacrifices must be made, starting usually with the ones that that lead to short term pleasures. But, the hard choice will usually bring the most long term benefit and reward.

Growth can be a very painful and uncomfortable process. Learn to recognize and love these sensations.

By knowing these instances, we can actually find enjoyment and satisfaction in these painful moments, acknowledging the “need” one has for these experiences in order to reach higher levels of wisdom and growth.

This lesson can most potently be found within the Nauthiz rune; as trials, tribulations, and resistance in life can ultimately force one to become stronger in mind, body and spirit. Likewise, the rune represents a “make or break” aspect within ourselves, where we can either succeed by force of will, or fail out of weakness.

In summary, it is important to remember that the comfortable life doesn’t give one wisdom.

Life, in many ways and for all beings, is war.

Take a look at your life, choices and actions. Make sure they are aligned with your growth and not just pure change. Strive to conquer obstacles and not cowardly avoid things that are hard to do or figure out.

Wisdom must be hunted for within dark corners; wandered for with sweat and blood.

Essentially, wisdom is experienced, not learned.

Get out there and find it!

Tradition and Rhythm

“(Tradition) cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labor.” – T.S. Eliot

Unless we establish rigorous and unshakable tradition in our own lives, we will never experience the countless secrets hidden in the rhythms of nature.

Like the seasons, like the cosmos, like music…

Everything is acting in rhythm.

The spinning wheel, the beating drum, ritual, poetry…

All emulations of this rhythm.

Everyday, every minute, every action has its place.

ᚱ ᚱ ᚱ

Insight into the Function, Form and Relationship Between Odin and Thor

          Odin has long been viewed in connection with the wind and inspiration, while Thor has been related to willpower, strength, and action. These two forces, in an elemental or alchemical context, represent two distinct functions of the self-development of the Superindividual, Übermensch, Buddha, Druid, Shaman, Monk, Priest etc. The two parts of this mechanism include first the fire, which in this metaphor would be a symbolic “inner” fire, regarded centrally within the gut or deep in the lungs. Some would equate this to the Will and the willingness to act on instinct and intentions with confidence and clarity. The second part is the wind or air, represented by Odin, as the fanning breath that inspires the fire to grow and develop. Fire needs breath. As we’ve all seen, wind or breath is what inspires fire to rage, dance, live, generate more energy and produce more heat. In this regard, Thor is our internal flame, the force of Will, strength and action within us, while Odin is the oxygen, wind or current that breathes inspiration (like a bellows) onto the internal flame, causing it to rage and ultimately be “inspired” to grow and conquer more. These two deities, represented by Wind and Fire, are necessary to form the self-actualized and potent man. This man is concrete in focus and intensity, able to live in strength, wisdom, and constant action. 

          Unifying the two forces of Odin and Thor seems to have been accomplished and utilized by certain classes and aspects of society, as not everyone was meant to form and manipulate the fire that exists within. Traditionally, this would have been a practice of the Priest/King and Warrior classes, who’s function was to control chaos and keep alive the organism of society. Essentially, these Priest/Kings were embodiments of the Gods on Earth, and the same responsibility would be bestowed upon them, usually ending in their sacrifice if crops failed, famine ensued, or war was lost. Although the unification of these two forces is necessary for certain individuals and both deities were widely worshipped and observed alongside each other, the two cults of Odin and Thor were highly different in their more basic, daily, and practical functions. There were completely different lifestyle qualities, goals, skills, approaches to life, and ultimately different methods in overall purpose and intent. The cult of Thor generally resides around the community, fertility, farming and the “thrall” lifestyle that most humans experienced within the tribe or larger group. Because of this, Thor was the most widely worshipped of the ancient gods and was the chief deity observed by the common folk. Thor protects man from chaos and endows power into material forms. This force keeps man strong and determined, acting in accordance with honor and vitality. Thor represents the physical and temporal qualities of human life, things we can build, destroy, and manipulate in accordance with our Will.

          The esoteric meaning of this deity is rarely observed and utilized but is very beneficial and powerful when introduced and practiced with other occult techniques and connotations. This occult function of Thor can be seen most clearly in the Siberian and Sami Pagan religions, who venerate the Thunder god “Horagalles,” which translates to Old Man Thor. Through Shamanic/Odinic techniques they use the element of Thunder to induce trance through rhythm, inducing the visionary travel and prophetic hallucinations famous to their practice. Here it seems the Thunder God takes on the more singular roll of community protector, Shaman, student of wisdom and the living bridge or messenger of the gods. It is possible that this sorcery was originally a single, unified practice, until eventually splitting into multiple cults and focuses as people spread out of the Northern Steppes.

The Norse god Óðinn, from a 1760 Icelandic paper manuscript (Copenhagen, Danish Royal Library, MS NKS 1867 4º, f. 94r)

          The cult of Odin is a much different beast when approached in a focused and direct way. As I’ve stated, many Pagans, past and present, acknowledge and venerate both Gods, but it is fair to say that most Germanic Pagans lean one way or the other when it comes to utmost devotion and dedication of spirit. Odin is a self-development, war, and artist God, one associated with mantic wisdom and mad obsession to obtain knowledge and conquer new metaphysical territory, whether for the good or bad, helpful, or detrimental. The Odinist develops the self, and in doing so thus inspires the community to follow suit, acting in accordance with the archetype (or one of the many archetypes) of the God. Odin is the god of nobility, artists, and kings, the ones whom the myths, legends, and culture of the tribe is associated with and known for. Through acts of brilliance, magic, prophecy and wisdom, Odin (and his devoted) inspire and pass on wisdom and tradition to the rest of the community. This inspiring force ultimately leads the tribe towards greatness, stirring the “flame” of Thor to burn powerfully within the soul of the group, instigating excellence from all instead of the enabling of weakness and brittleness.

          When it comes to esoteric, occult, or alternative views on these Gods, we can easily see their different function in the psychology of the human mind. However, when brought into union, we can see how this formula of wind and fire is necessary (and without lack of potency) when it comes to developing strong, wise, and sturdy acolytes. Greatness and madness go hand in hand; like wind and fire. Odin and Thor, in the soul of the sorcerer or warrior, must be unlocked and unified to become completely unhinged in potential and intensity.

Allegany, New York
Winter, 2022
Photo by Ariale Miller.

Reflections of the Winter Solstice

Blood on the Birch, cold was the night

wind and snow, to and fro…

Gaut of the North, rides on the wind

traveling high, and down again.

Beyond the smoke, beyond the flames

disappear, within the dusk…

beyond our shapes, beyond our names

begin anew, from ash of luck.

Oak and Cherry, Apple and Spruce

white shades rising, under midnight blue…

thorns adorn all, that seek the flesh

faint lights flicker, far in the void.

Cry of the fox, sounds of the dark

break the silence, below the trees…

rays of the Moon, hooks of the soul

journey towards, Your majesty.

Strength in Balance Bindrune

This bindrune is meant to enhance balance, inspire clarity, and reinforce stability of the mind, emotions, and spirit. A central Eihwaz rune establishes the spine/trunk; the “axis mundi” or center of the spirit. It represents the self within the spell. On either end of the Eihwaz rune, we see the opposing elemental forces of fire and water. These forces are in their spiritual or creative/emotional forms, represented by Kenaz and Laguz. These runes are chosen instead of their primordial and destructive counterpart forms, Sowilo and Isaz, as to inspire internal balance, rather than to influence external forces out of our control. This concept should be considered when working with this bindrune, as the only things we are really able to control are ourselves and our own thinking. In the center rests the Ingwaz rune, the rune of stored energy and the gestational power of growth. Ingwaz is the seed that symbolizes the beginning stages of all ideas and life; the “Sacred Enclosure” that represents a place of Order, defended at all sides against the ever imposing forces of chaos. At the bottom right protrudes an Uruz rune, added as an additional reminder of the raw, primordial energy that exists within us. May this aid in your mastery over internal balance and stillness.

The Roads of Hel

It is more often written about, when referring to Winter, to discuss and focus on our maintaining and cultivating of light and fire (physical and metaphysical) in the home, family, and soul etc… We know of many Northern European customs, such as inviting the evergreen into our home during the Yule season, surrounding ourselves with family, song, and good cheer. All of this was done to maintain an “internal fire” within individuals and the “greater individual” of the community, combating an otherwise dark, uncertain, and gloomy part of the year. Symbols of hope, life, and fertility surround us while the Earth sleeps outside. However, this drive for “coziness” must also be mixed with an embrace for the bitter forces of Winter. The less spoken of, and less practically applicable operation in the modern world, is our need to mimic this cycle in its’ “darker” or more unseen aspects.

Winter must be internalized and used for “dark” magic. Acts and meditations that make us look inward and transform ourselves must be sought after and certain rites must be carried out. Chtonic indulgences and deep introspection must be undergone as we walk the roads of Hel within. All intensive personal work and external “curse” work should be done in the Winter; get rid of all your baggage, attachments, and rise anew with Spring, rejuvenated. The Winter is a time (and test) to impose our higher Will upon our internal canvas, “setting the bar,” so to speak, on our future self. While things are harsh outside, we must be harsh inside, becoming that which we see as our higher self, emerging victorious with the Sun. Unfetter yourself and your soul; heal the Hamingja.

Holy Trinity Bindrunes

These two bindrunes represent the Holy Trinity of ancient Germanic Paganism. The gods who encompass this trinity are traditionally the Sky Father, Earth Mother, and Thunder god. As seen on both runes, reading from top to bottom, we see the runes : : representing Odin (Sky Father), Thor (Thunder God), and Freyja (Earth Mother). The left bindrune is mirrored on both sides while the right consists of single runes.

Another cycle has begun.

The internal fires () have been lit. 

The torch () has been acquired. 

The dead () walk with us, 

side by side, 

ahead and behind. 

With full stomachs and full hearts. ()

Spirit becomes flame against the long night.

We will endure () all () with open arms,

as we journey towards the Throne ().

The runes ride () the Wind.

Another cycle () has begun…

Happy New Year.

The Wanderer

One of the most important things about Odinism is traveling.

This of course applies to the Shamanic or visionary aspect, but more importantly to the physical traveling or “wandering” of the Earth.

The Odinist must track down sacred places, spend nights alone in new woods, explore the vast deserts, the mountain peaks, the lakes and rivers and valleys green and lush. To enjoy reckless and unwavering ecstasy and new experience, to make new friends and open oneself to all the possibilities of life. To gain as much wisdom and knowledge as possible in this brief incarnation.

Wandering defeats fear and attachments; delivering solace in the self and a destruction of the need for useless “stuff.” Traveling shows us what is important to not only ourselves and our needs, but also that which is important to humans in general, as you will encounter every imaginable type of person to learn from along the way and begin to see patterns and similarities in people and even cultures.

This is Odinic action. The becoming of the wandering God.

Hailaz Wōdanaz!